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Birds of Passage

 

 

Original title:
Pajaros de verano
Slovenian title:
Poletne ptice
Section:
KINGS & QUEENS

Country, year:
Colombia, Denmark, Mexico, 2018
Length:
125

Directed by:
Ciro Guerra, Cristina Gallego

Screenplay:
Maria Camila Arias, Jacques Toulemonde Vidal
Cinematography:
David Gallego
Music:
Leonardo Heiblum
Subtitles:
slovenian
Language:
Spanish
Voting code:
G*
Cast:
Carmina Martínez (Ursula), José Acosta (Raphayet), Jhon Narváez (Moisés), Natalia Reyes (Zaida), José Vicente Cotes (Peregrino), Juan Martínez (Aníbal), Greider Meza (Leonidas)
Awards:
Cannes 2018 – Directors' Fortnight, Motovun 2018 (FIPRESCI Prize), Odessa 2018, Melbourne 2018, Locarno 2018


DateHourLocation 
Thu, 8.11.2018 21:30 Linhart Hall
Sat, 10.11.2018 19:00 Kino Šiška Cinema
Sun, 11.11.2018 14:30 Kino Komuna

Deli povezavo
Description:
The origins of the Colombian drug trade through the epic story of an indigenous family that becomes involved in the booming business of selling marijuana in the 1970s.

Young Raphayet asks for Zaida's hand in marriage during her initiation rite. She is the daughter of a local matriarch, Ursula, who rules over her tribe with a mix of superstition and determination. Ursula and Raphayet's uncle manage to agree upon the dowry. But the amount is too much for the groom - who traffics in liquor and coffee beans - to handle. After one of his delivery runs, Raphayet comes across a band of American hippies who are looking for cannabis to sell back home. Raphayet thus rises from petty merchant to major player in a clan that will exponentially enrich itself over the next decade. But the newfound wealth will put their culture and their ancestral traditions at stake.

"There have indeed been numerous films about narcotrafficking /.../. This said, the aptly named bonanza marinbera, a period of exportation of cannabis to the USA in the 70's and the 80's, particularly involving the Guajira desert /.../ was, in our opinion, a significant story that hadn't been told. In Columbian art, there's often a glorification of violence, as well as a fascination for power and the most brutal aspects of this story, yet no one seemed interested in venturing into a deeper reflection. This one-sided representation appeared problematic to us." (Ciro Guerra)
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